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2012 BlackBerry 10 Roadmap

December 13th, 2011

The other day we were told about the 2012 BlackBerry 10 Roadmap. The first image of the BlackBerry Milan is saw by us. This looks to be the next generation Slider device that will be supporting BlackBerry 10. The look of the device looks a little bit like the BlackBerry London device we saw a couple weeks back.  You can see the topped round edges on the device that can also be found on the BlackBerry PlayBook.

 

blackberry-milan

Also you can see that there is no more trackpad, call/end, back, or BlackBerry menu key on the device. Looks like RIM is going to use gestures on the new devices. It’s still early so we don’t have that many specs or information on the device but when we do get it you will know! Any other comments would be much appreciated.

Operator Billing

December 9th, 2011

Today we would like to talk about that Indosat to Operator billing BlackBerry App World.

Customers will be able to apply their BlackBerry App World purchases directly to their monthly bill from Indosat

Operator billing will allow Indosat’s BlackBerry customers to conveniently and securely purchase apps from BlackBerry App World and charge the purchases directly to their Indosat bill. Customers will also be able to charge in-app purchases to their Indosat bill, which allows for the purchase of digital goods, such as additional content or more levels to a game, to be made without interrupting the application experience.

About Research In Motion
Research In Motion (RIM), a global leader in wireless innovation, revolutionized the mobile industry with the introduction of the BlackBerry® solution in 1999. Today, BlackBerry products and services are used by millions of customers around the world to stay connected to the people and content that matter most throughout their day. Founded in 1984 and based in Waterloo, Ontario, RIM operates offices in North America, Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America. RIM is listed on the NASDAQ Stock Market (NASDAQ: RIMM) and the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: RIM). For more information, visit www.rim.com or www.BlackBerry.com

Forward-looking statements in this news release are made pursuant to the "safe harbor" provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and applicable Canadian securities laws. When used herein, words such as "expect", "anticipate", "estimate",  "may",  "will", "should", "intend," "believe", and similar expressions, are intended to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are based on estimates and assumptions made by RIM in light of its experience and its perception of historical trends, current conditions and expected future developments, as well as other factors that RIM believes are appropriate in the circumstances. Many factors could cause RIM’s actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements, including those described in the "Risk Factors" section of RIM’s Annual Information Form, which is included in its Annual Report on Form 40-F (copies of which filings may be obtained at www.sedar.com or www.sec.gov). These factors should be considered carefully, and readers should not place undue reliance on RIM’s forward-looking statements. RIM has no intention and undertakes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

The BlackBerry and RIM families of related marks, images and symbols are the exclusive properties and trademarks of Research In Motion Limited.  RIM, Research In Motion and BlackBerry are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and may be pending or registered in other countries. All other brands, product names,company names, trademarks and service marks are the properties of their respective owners. RIM assumes no obligations or liability and makes no representation, warranty, endorsement or guarantee in relation to any aspect of any third party products or services.

Any comment on this topic would be much appreciated.

BlackBerry Giveaways in NYC With “NYC Holiday Hookups from BlackBerry”

December 8th, 2011

 

 

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RIM is celebrating the holiday season in New York City this year with BlackBerry Teams roaming the city for “NYC Holiday Hookups from BlackBerry.” The fun starts today until December 17th with BlackBerry teams around NYC doing exclusive giveaways. If you live in NYC or are visiting NYC keep an eye out for BlackBerry “Alerts” image006 and scan the barcode on the back to add RIM to your BBM list.

RIM will be promoting offers for BlackBerry users in New York giving away BlackBerry Bold 9900/9930 devices, accessories, and coffee gift cards to keep you warm as it gets colder! Let us know if you spot anything. I will definitely be keeping an eye out when I am roaming the city.

Android App Player on BlackBerry Q & A

December 6th, 2011

Today we just saw an article about Andorid APP Player. Now we would like to share with you.

This is recorded from BlackBerry DevCon 2011. The following are some of the biggest lingering questions on the topic of Android Apps on BlackBerry for those who don’t have time to listen to the audio. Keep reading for more!

Android Apps on BlackBerry Q & A / FAQ / or whatever you wanna call it :)

Questions asked and answered in Kevin’s words based on press conference audio above…

Q: What versions of Android will BBX Support?
A: Research In Motion plans to support any open-sourced versions of Android.  Currently version 2.3 is the newest version of Android that Google has released open source code for, so that’s what the PlayBook OS / BBX currently support. When Google releases open source code for Ice Cream Sandwich, BBX will support that.

Q: Why can’t users just install APK files onto BlackBerry?
A: RIM has their own security protocols, etc. on the QNX platform so they require apps to be in the .bar format. 

Q: What kind of apps are best suited to the Android app player?
A: RIM has found that ~70% of Android apps port over with little or no issue. Apps that suit the Android App Player best are apps that are self-contained (think games) or apps that pull in data from the web (apps for websites, etc.). We’ve been finding the compatibility % to be more along the lines of 50%.

Q: How important are Android apps to BlackBerry on the BBX platform? What % of apps in App World will be re-packaged Android Apps?
A: RIM wouldn’t give a definite percentage here, but do think re-packaged apps will make up a significant contribution to the App World catalog. RIM also made it clear that Android apps on BlackBerry are more of a bonus to the ecosystem. RIM made it clear that the two main pillars of the BBX platform as presented during the DevCon keynote are HTML 5 (WebWorks SDK) and C++ (Native SDK). That being said, RIM wants to make it as easy as possible for apps to make it onto the platform, which is what the AIR SDK allows for as does the Android runtime. The most integrated apps (super apps) and high performing apps (games) will ideally be built on one of the primary platforms, but for developers looking to expose their apps to more ecosystems and get their foot in the door of BlackBerry, supporting android apps and flash apps makes good sense. 

Q: What Android APIs are not supported?
A: A whole bunch of Android hardware and software features are not supported through the APIs. RIM is working on reducing this list to make more of the APIs available, but also stated they will choose to not support certain ones for "business reasons." They wouldn’t get into details here, so time will tell.

Q: Do I need the source code for an Android app to port it over to BlackBerry?
A: No, you just need the .apk file.

Q: So does that mean App World will run rampant with Android apps that were not intended to be in there?
A: No. The submission process is still the same here. You need to sign up as a developer with App World. If you submit apps, you need to have the rights to those apps for them to get published. 

Q: Will RIM do anything to stop individual PlayBook owners from sideloading Android apps onto their PlayBook that they don’t have the rights to?
A: Crickets chirping. See our BlackBerry PlayBook Apps forum for lots of already-ported Android apps.

Q: To the consumer who owns a BBX device, will they know they are downloading Android apps from App World?
A: Not until they open the installed app (and even then they may not notice). Technically once ported to a .bar file and submitted to App World, these are BlackBerry apps and the developer is now a BlackBerry developer. Consumers browsing App World will not know if they are downloading an app that was ported over from Android. This is the same notion in that consumers don’t know if they’re downloading apps today that were built Native or in Flash. Once installed on the PlayBook, the application shortcut  style/treatment is exactly the same as any other app. However, once they open an app that was ported from Android, they will realize they are in an app that was originally developed for Android. Under the current implementation on the PlayBook OS 2.0, the app opens in the Android App Player. Also, app design intended for Android kind of stick out (settings screens designed to match Android UI, etc.).

Q: Will RIM push the fact that they are supporting Android Apps on BlackBerry?
A: The answer isn’t 100% clear here from RIM, but impression is that the Android Apps on BlackBerry message is currently targeted towards Android developers, tech media, Wall Street and current PlayBook owners as an answer to the question of how is RIM going to get more apps on the platform. RIM’s take is that an app on the platform is an app – consumers don’t care what SDK it was built on. So it’s very likely you won’t see much consumer-facing marketing on Android app support when BBX phones PlayBook OS 2.0 arrive. Right now it’s a message that has to be out there to get Android developers taking advantage of it, and to keep everybody in the loop, but once the apps are there and devices are on sale, it’ll probably be a pretty quiet marketing message on Android app support.  Note – one of the reasons I think they won’t want to make the message strong to consumers is that’ll create confusion that all apps in the Android marketplace will be available on BBX devices – which will not be the case.

Q: Will the Android App Player experience look the same on the consumer release of PlayBook OS 2.0/BBX phones as it does right now on the developer beta of OS 2.0?
A: Not sure, but hopefully it will be changed from the current implementation. Right now the Android App Player opens as one app on the PlayBook. If you open additional Android apps, they load within the App Player (and you can toggle between them within the App Player) instead of opening multiple app instances as do other apps on the PlayBook OS. Personally I think this is a big issue as it breaks the user interface consistency on the PlayBook – so I think it’s smart that they not release it as it is to consumers. They need Android apps to feel as native PlayBook as possible, which to me means running multiple app instances of Android apps at the same time, and being able to toggle between them with the standard gestures. It appeared to me that RIM is aware of this and working towards that goal. Other features are being implemented to help with this native feeling – for example, if Android apps require the keyboard, they popup the PlayBook’s keyboard, not the Android keyboard. We’re told a lot of "magic" is happening at the QNX level to interface Android into QNX for hardware and software calls.

Q: Has RIM been talking to Google about this Android App Player implementation on BlackBerry?
A: …….. No real answer, but definitely don’t have the impression that this initiative has Google’s permission or blessing, not that RIM needs it with open sourced versions of Android.

Q: Has RIM thought about ingesting Android apps from third party Android app marketplaces? So instead of bringing over apps from single developers, do a deal with a third party app store (that already has the relationships with lots of individual developers) to port over as much of their catalogs of apps as possible?
A: Definitely something that RIM has considered. Wouldn’t confirm if they’re doing it or not. This approach could immediately bring over a ton of apps to the platform, but could be a nightmare (developers waking up getting support emails for their apps in App World, even though they didn’t put them there as it was one of their distributors that did).

Q: How have Android developers been responding to this initiative? How do you convert them from just porting over Android apps to developing for BlackBerry?
A: (From Larry talking about when he’s doing presentations on this in the valley). At first the Android devs are sitting there with their arms folded, not looking that interested. By the time he shows them the tools and how easy it is, they’re much more receptive and eager to test out all their apps. He’s been finding a lot of Android developers know very little about the BlackBerry platform, so this is a great way to expose them to it and to making money and downloads from BlackBerry users (Android market isn’t that great for making $$ for devs). As Android devs start to make money on App World, there should be a natural conversion for them to want to improve their apps (go native). And RIM will actively be working with developers to gear devs up to make the best apps possible.

Q: If a developer decides to re-make their Android app with another BlackBerry SDK, will they keep all their ratings, etc. in App World?
A: Yes, assuming the developer wants to. The app id, title, comments, ratings, etc. will carry through – the developer is just replacing the .bar file with an updated .bar file. App World doesn’t know it’s been replaced via a differently developed app.

Conclusion

There’s still some work to be done with the implementation of the Android App Player on BBX, but for apps that do port over successfully the user experience should be pretty solid. For consumers, it means more apps in App World (and a fun time sideloading all the ones that are not in App World but you can find the .apk for). The existence of the Android App Player also makes for a great introduction for Android developers to get a taste of BlackBerry and even start making some money off the platform. It’s widely known that most Android developers don’t make a lot of money off of Android Marketplace. If/when they see some money rolling in from BlackBerry users it could get a lot of them more seriously looking at BlackBerry and the BBX platform. And for developers now contemplating whether to built or to port, they should definitely check out this article on it looking at the App Player from a developer perspective. 

2012 BBX BlackBerry Roadmap

December 5th, 2011

If you have been paying attention to RIM’s financial issues you probably know that BlackBerry 7 devices aren’t doing as hot as RIM wanted them to do. I always did say that BlackBerry 7 device would be RIM’s hold over device until they released the new QNX device, now known as the BBX devices.

2011 didn’t have it’s shortage of BlackBerry devices. We saw the BlackBerry Bold 9900/9930/9790, Torch 9850/9860/9810, Curve 9380/9370/9360, and we also saw the launch of the P’9981 which was the Porsche design BlackBerry device.  All of these devices were rocking so very nice hardware that was first seen in BlackBerry devices such as better processors, more memory and better cameras. The 2012 BlackBerry devices will have even more!

2012 BBX BlackBerry Devices

The first BlackBerry device the will be supporting the new BBX will be the BlackBerry London device the we saw pictures of a few weeks ago.  This device will be an all touchscreen device which some have questioned because when they think of BlackBerry devices they think of keyboard devices. However RIM needs to do something that is different and game changing. RIM’s target release for the BlackBerry London is March 2012 but if you have been following RIM for awhile like I have then you know that RIM isn’t very good at keeping release dates. We should see this device at CES which is in January.

There are a lot more devices that we should see in 2012. One of those devices is being codenamed BlackBerry Milan which is code number is R071. This makes us believe that this could be the CDMA version of BlackBerry London. It could also be a AT&T/Rogers exclusive device.

The BlackBerry Lisbon device is something we really don’t know a lot of but we are thinking that it might be a Slider type device.

Now the BlackBerry Nevada will be the BlackBerry device that BlackBerry users have been dreaming about. This is rumored to be a BlackBerry Qwerty device running QNX that will be very similar to the Bold 9900/9930.

Now the BlackBerry Forest is something we have been hearing about for some time. I apparently is a 10″ BlackBerry PlayBook. When the BlackBerry PlayBook originally released we heard that RIM would be working on a 10″ PlayBook but then we were told it was scrapped due to design issues. Now looks like RIM is thinking about trying to give it a go again.  RIM has said that they are committed to Tablets and are going to continue to support them.  I for one still believe in the BlackBerry PlayBook even though it hasn’t received certain features. I still think it is one of the best tablets on the market and will only get better!

One thing we didn’t learn about is BlackBerry 7.1. RIM has said that they are not going to just kill off the current BlackBerry OS. They will continue to support it for sometime even after the launch of BBX devices. We know that OS 7.1 is in the works and has some nice features such as mobile hotspot but we don’t know when we will see it officially hit the market.

2012 looks to be a very promising year for RIM and BlackBerry. I for one am very excited to see BBX in action. I do believe that it will bring RIM and BlackBerry up to another level in the Smartphone world! What device are you most exicted to see?

More Specifics For BBX, 4G PlayBook and Native PIM Apps

December 2nd, 2011

It is said that PlayBook and OS 7 devices are anxiously looking forward to BBX devices, Bridge enhancements, and the 4G PlayBook. The details that have been revealed so far give us reason to keep our faith.

Here’s Ronen’s highlights:

  • 4G PlayBooks will launch around the same time (early 2012) as the Playbook 2.0 OS which is scheduled for February 2012. It has been in testing for several months on multiple carriers.
  • PlayBook OS 2.0 will be bringing speed improvements to Bridge without many UI changes. Mostly improvement and functionality. There will be “some updates down the road”
  • RIM has teams working on extending PlayBook video chat into an endpoint for corporate video chat so it is beyond just device to device. (I want to know more!)
  • PlayBook messages and PIM will sync almost as fast as smartphones.
  • The push infrastructure is the same as the current smartphone push but the moderator did not think PIN to PIN messaging was in OS 2.0 yet
  • OS 2.0 will have spell-check with type ahead and word prediction
  • S/MIME encryption will not be available at OS 2.0 launch but will be available shortly after
  • Currently the PlayBook native email does not color code BES vs Personal email
  • BlackBerry Mobile Fusion server can handle 10,000+ users per server compared to the current 2,000 user limit.
  • RIM Plans on making more apps be able to connect to the internet over bridge
  • RIM is looking into other PlayBook sizes
  • The 4G PlayBook will not have voice capabilities beside video chat at first. The initial release will be data and video chat. There will also be third party apps that can make regular calls but nothing from RIM.
  • Corporate and personal contacts are in one general list but the device knows which is which. Any new contact will be corporate by default.
Author: Jessie Categories: News & Updates Tags: ,

Questions Answered About BBX, PlayBook 4G and Native PIM Applications

November 30th, 2011

Here is a transcript of some of the questions from the event where we learned about the PIM apps on PlayBook.

Q: If the BES server sits behind the firewall, and you’re concerned about security, are the two email accounts (the personal and the corporate) still separate? In the sense that if I want to send myself a note to my personal account it still goes through the Exchange Server outside the firewall, right?

A: Yeah, so the question was about security within the multiple emails. With this setup, if I send a message from my corporate account to my personal, is it still going back behind the firewall? Absolutely. The infrastructure is the exact same and we’re not doing anything to compromise security. When we get into the BlackBerry Balance portion of the presentation, we’ll talk about resonant data on the device how that is segmented off and protected. Even locally on the device you can’t copy and paste things from one perimeter into another. In that sense, yes, it would go back through the infrastructure, to your Exchange Server, and then follow the guidelines that you have set within your organization.

Q: What do you do about S/MIME?

A: S/MIME on the first iteration of the 2.0 software will not be available initially but will available shortly after.

Q: Will PlayBook 2.0 have the ability to color code the messages?

A: So the question is about setting a border color to denote whether it’s corporate or personal. I have not seen that on the PlayBook but granted I’m not on the final build. We’ll have to get back to that.

Q: Can you edit and spell check on the native email app?

A: Yes, absolutely. The logic we have on the BlackBerry in terms of type ahead and word prediction is all in the 2.0 code. You will have the spell check capabilities.

Q: How fast do the native PIM apps sync with your BlackBerry? Is there a delay?

A: It’s all relatively the same time. I haven’t noticed any delay on messages getting delivered to the PlayBook versus my BlackBerry. Most of the time it’s device, then shortly after PlayBook.

Followup Q: And it’s all the same Push infrastructure?

A: Yes. The infrastructure is essentially the same. The way it works on your BlackBerry is essentially the same as it works on your PlayBook. So the same secure, push channel that you’re accustomed to on your BlackBerry.

Q: Any difference in the ressource requirements on the server side?

A: We’re actually doing those tests now. One of the things that we’re improving is that today on BES you have a 2,000 user limit, with the new infrastructure we’re actually increasing that to several thousand more. We’re reducing the size of your infrastructure including unnecessary load and resources. While I don’t have final numbers on load balancing, the numbers that are coming in are next to nothing. So the normal 1 to 1 correlation to what you have.

Q: What about PIN messaging? As in PIN-to-PIN messaging. We didn’t see that.

A: Yes, and I won’t show you. I don’t believe PIN-to-PIN messaging is in the first iteration but I’ll have to check.

Q: What about Bridge?

A: In version 2.0 there are improvements to the speed of Bridge. There’s not many UI changes, just mostly improvement and small functionality. We’re not abandoning Bridge. While the 2.0 will have performance improvements there will be some updates down the road.

Q: Version 2.0 won’t have cellular connectivity?

A: So 2.0 is just software. The cellular devices or the “4G PlayBooks” will be available roughly around the 2.0 software release. The 2.0 software is designed to run on your current, WiFi only PlayBooks, but we will have 4G PlayBooks around the same time as that 2.0 software.

Q: In many government organizations we don’t have WiFi access. Everything is land based. So I rely on the Bridge for my functionality and we love the video chat but the problem is we can’t use it. Is there a way for us to get access to more of those apps through Bridge?

A: We’ve seen that already. The last update to Bridge allows some applications to use the connection to get out to the Internet. We’re going to of course increase the functionality of core apps to utilize Bridge.

Q: Is the PlayBook 4G being delayed?

A: We have been in testing for several months on 4G devices and on multiple carriers. Several groups are actively testing them and I have not heard of any delays. As of today (November 22nd), I have not heard anything that would put us off schedule from our early 2012 release.

Q: Will the PlayBook come in other sizes?

A: Of course we’re obviously investigating sizes and what makes sense for a larger screen. So yes, I don’t know the exact size and I can’t show you anything, but we’re looking at other sizes.

Q: Does the 4G capability imply voice functionality?

A: Not at first, besides the video chat. There is no ability to make a call from PlayBook to landline call. That’s not the final answer though. Initial release will be strictly data and video chat. There are also third party apps that will let you make a call from PlayBook to landline but not from RIM.

Q: Current video chat – can it be extended from PlayBook to something else?

A: We have teams that are working right now to make it an endpoint to a corporate video chat solution. So we’re in discussions about how that’s going to work. There’s definitely a roadmap for video chat that lets it do more than just device to device.

Q: What about segregating the Address Book by corporate and personal?

A: From a group perspective? The contacts are in one general list and there’s no way to see if they’re a personal or business contact. The device will know based on the service it’s pulling from. Any new contact will be corporate by default (I believe).

Q: What about synchronizing multiple Address Books into one?

A: I have not tried it so I can’t give you a definite answer just yet. I imagine it would still just dump it as one Address Book but I’d have to verify.

Author: Jessie Categories: Others Tags: , ,

5 Things RIM Has Done Right

November 28th, 2011

It’s common for media to lambaste RIM and its smartphones and tablet. The company does deserve some of the criticism it receives, but what’s strange is that it doesn’t receive any credit where it’s due. Here are 5 areas where we believe RIM should get more recognition.

1. NFC - With the latest BlackBerry 7 devices, RIM has made a firm commitment to NFC. There are several devices in RIM’s current portfolio that have support for NFC and the company has been put on record saying there will be many more. In order for all of us to take advantage of mobile payments, merchants need to know that there are enough users out there to warrant the cost and effort of implementing. If smartphone manufacturers don’t invest and bet on this technology, it will never happen. NFC is a chicken and the egg type of problem and RIM is the chicken. I’m not sure if that makes sense but you get what I’m saying.

2. Enterprise - There is a major change in the way enterprise views mobile. It’s called employee liable versus corporate liable devices and there is a growing number of the former entering the workplace. RIM sees this shift and has created a unique BES feature called BlackBerry balance that extends to both the smartphone and tablet. Because of RIM, employees can download apps and be a part of the mobile scene, without compromising the company’s data.

3. Efficiency - You can write an email to someone faster from a BlackBerry than other smartphones. With keyboard shortcuts, universal search and the best keyboard on the planet, a BlackBerry is hands-down the most efficient smartphone. There’s a lot RIM needs to be doing but with regards to making our lives more productive RIM needs not change anything.

4. Openness - RIM has made some great commitments to open source projects and even has a github page over at GitHub.com/blackberry. There are several ways to make apps for BlackBerry these days including HTHML5, Adobe Flash, Java and C.

5. First Party Apps – BlackBerry Traffic, Twitter, Protect and Maps are all great applications. RIM is unique in its ability to own the hardware and churn out a suite of apps that set the bar high for not just other developers, but for the industry.

Author: Jessie Categories: News & Updates Tags: , ,

RIM Announces The BlackBerry Curve 9380 and Bold 9790!

November 25th, 2011

Research In Motion Expands BlackBerry 7 Portfolio with the New BlackBerry Bold 9790 and BlackBerry Curve 9380 Smartphones

Jakarta, Indonesia and Waterloo, ON – Research In Motion (RIM) (NASDAQ: RIMM; TSX: RIM) today announced two new smartphones based on the BlackBerry® 7 operating system (OS) – the BlackBerry® Bold™ 9790 and BlackBerry® Curve™ 9380.

Both smartphones offer enhanced communications, multimedia, productivity and social connectivity features together with slim and stylish designs. The BlackBerry Bold 9790 features an iconic design that seamlessly integrates a highly tactile keyboard, optical trackpad and high resolution touch display. The BlackBerry Curve 9380 is the first-ever BlackBerry® Curve™ smartphone with an all-touch display.

“We are very excited to expand the BlackBerry 7 portfolio with the new BlackBerry Bold 9790 and BlackBerry Curve 9380,” said Carlo Chiarello, Senior Vice President, Handheld Product Management at Research In Motion. “BlackBerry smartphones offer a uniquely refined mobile communications experience that people love and we think many customers will be thrilled by the faster performance, beautiful touch displays and sleek designs available with these new BlackBerry 7 based models.”

BlackBerry Bold 9790 Smartphone with Touch Display and Keyboard

Built with premium materials and finishes, the BlackBerry Bold 9790 smartphone combines a highly tactile keyboard with a high-resolution and highly responsive touch display and a precise optical trackpad, all in a narrow design that is easy to carry and very comfortable to hold.  With the BlackBerry 7 OS and a powerful 1GHz processor, the BlackBerry Bold 9790 delivers fast, smooth performance for web browsing, working with documents, and enjoying multimedia. It includes 8GB of onboard memory and an expandable memory card slot that supports up to 32 GB of additional storage.

All-Touch BlackBerry Curve 9380 Smartphone

The finely crafted BlackBerry Curve 9380 is the first all-touch smartphone in the BlackBerry Curve family. It features a highly responsive and brilliant 3.2” high resolution display and comes with preinstalled social networking apps, including BBM™ (BlackBerry® Messenger), Facebook®, Twitter™ and Social Feeds apps, that offer a smoothly integrated mobile experience. It also has a 5MP camera with flash and video recording allowing users to easily capture and share their favorite moments with their family, friends and colleagues.

Powerful BlackBerry 7 OS

The BlackBerry Bold 9790 and BlackBerry Curve 9380 are both powered by the new BlackBerry 7 OS, which delivers a faster and richer user experience with improved browsing, voice-activated searches, and support for Augmented Reality and NFC (Near Field Communications). It also includes the ability to manage personal content separately from corporate content, and comes with a variety of personal and productivity apps out of the box.

BlackBerry 7 also introduces an enhanced browser that provides a significantly faster, more fluid web browsing experience. The browser includes a new JIT (just in time) JavaScript compiler to improve the load time speed of web pages and it offers optimized HTML5 performance for incredible gaming and video experiences. The popular universal search capability has also been enhanced with support for voice-activated search, so users can simply speak to begin searching their device and the web for information.

The BlackBerry Bold 9790 and BlackBerry Curve 9380 smartphones include built-in support for Augmented Reality and NFC, allowing users to connect with the world around them in fresh new ways. With the Wikitude Augmented Reality application, users can find nearby BBM (BlackBerry Messenger) contacts in real-time, read reviews on restaurants close to them, or get the story behind an interesting landmark and points of interest. NFC also enables many new and exciting capabilities, including the ability to make mobile payments, pair accessories or read SmartPoster tags with a simple tap of the smartphone.

BlackBerry 7 includes a number of preinstalled applications and integrated functionality for increasing productivity and easy sharing and collaboration right out of the box. The Premium version of Documents To Go is included free of charge, offering users powerful document editing features as well as a native PDF document viewer. BlackBerry® Protect is pre-loaded*, offering customers the peace of mind that personal data can be backed up and secured in the cloud.  BlackBerry® Balance is integrated in BlackBerry 7, allowing users to enjoy the full BlackBerry smartphone experience for both work and personal purposes without compromising the IT department’s need for advanced security and IT controls. The Social Feeds (2.0) app has been extended to capture updates from media and favorites all in one consolidated view. The Facebook for BlackBerry smartphones (2.0) app introduces features like Facebook chat and BBM integration that makes it easier for users to connect with their Facebook friends in real time.

Availability

The BlackBerry Bold 9790 and BlackBerry Curve 9380 smartphones will begin to be available from various carriers around the world over the coming weeks. Availability dates for specific devices from specific carriers will be announced in conjunction with RIM’s partners.

Additional Information

* BlackBerry Protect will be pre-loaded where available. Check with your local operator for availability.

About Research In Motion

Research In Motion (RIM), a global leader in wireless innovation, revolutionized the mobile industry with the introduction of the BlackBerry® solution in 1999. Today, BlackBerry products and services are used by millions of customers around the world to stay connected to the people and content that matter most throughout their day. Founded in 1984 and based in Waterloo, Ontario, RIM operates offices in North America, Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America. RIM is listed on the NASDAQ Stock Market (NASDAQ: RIMM) and the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX: RIM). For more information, visit www.rim.com or www.blackberry.com.

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RIM confirms Power Issues with BlackBerry 7 Smartphones

November 24th, 2011

For a while now we’ve been hearing of some BlackBerry 7 smartphones just dying. Most of the time the dead devices are after the device has been charging all night. Well a RIM spokesperson has confirm the power issue with this statement:

A RIM spokeswoman confirmed that a “limited number of customers have reported an issue where their devices will not power on.” She said the company is “actively working on a software update to resolve this issue.”

 

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The dead device issue seems to happen around most of the newer BlackBerry 7 smartphones, including the Bold 9900, 9930, and Torch 9850, 9860, etc. More details to come if we hear from RIM about it…